Illegal Usages of U.S. Revenue Stamps as Other Types

An interesting subsection of on-document examples is that of the illegal use of revenue stamps as postage.

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Scott # 63

63

Illegal use of 1-cent Benjamin Franklin (Scott #63) postage stamp as a revenue stamp, along with a nominally illegal use of the 1-cent Proprietary (R3c), as well as numerous 2-cent revenues, on a ledger page.

Catalogue value shown is for normal postal use on cover.

 

Scott # R2c

R2c

Rare illegal use of R2c on document, along with an R50a, R42c, and two R5c, totalling 50 cents in payment.

 

Scott # R2c

R2c

Used in conjunction with an R19c on a promissory note. Nominally illegal usage, as Playing Cards revenue stamps were not supposed to be used on documents. While the stamps not rare per se, the Playing Cards and Proprietary types are considerably more difficult to find on document than other 1st issue revenue types.

 

Scott # R3c

R3c

Two R3c singles on bank check, a nominally illegal usage (the different first types were permitted to be used interchangably, with the exception of the 'proprietary' and 'playing cards' types).

 

Scott # R3c

R3c

Nominally illegal use of a pair of R3c on a recipt, the bottom stamp showing a strong guide line at bottom.

 

Scott # R12c

R12c

Nominally illegal use, as playing cards types were not supposed to be used on documents.

 

Scott # R13b

R13b

Nominally illegal use of proprietary type as a documentary. Very scarce and exceptional centering.

 

Scott # R13b

R13b

Nominally illegal use of proprietary stamp as documentary. Absolutely huge vertical margins.

 

Scott # R29c

R29c

Horizontal block of 6 plus a single R29c and a single R60c on a promissary note. Blocks of R29c are fairly scarce and nominally illegally usage to use a proprietary stamp as a documentary. This is the first I've seen on document.

 

Scott # RB1a

RB1a

RB1a used illegally on document along with two R135 (including one with margin imprint capture) and an R24c, paying the correct 10-cent tax on a $175 promissory note.

 

Scott # RB2a

RB2a

Nominally illegal use of a proprietary stamp as a documentary.

 

Scott # RB2a

RB2a

Nominally illegal use of a proprietary stamp as a documentary on a dividend check.

 

Scott # RB2b

RB2b

Great (illegal?) use of a 1st Issue proprietary on check. Nice mining vignette as well.

 

Scott # RB2b

RB2b

Nominally illegal use of a proprietary as a documentary on a check.

 

Scott # RB12a

RB12a

Doubly scarce: an illegal use of a proprietary stamp as postage on a foreign exchange document, along with German revenue stamps affixed to the reverse. Combination usages of U.S. and non-U.S. revenue stamps on the same document from this era are exceptionally rare.

 

Scott # RB12a

RB12a

Nominally illegal use of a proprietary stamp as a documentary on a check.

 

Scott # RB28

RB28

Line block of 4 used illegally as documentary stamps on an 1899 marriage license. Same document as the one shown on this page, also an illegal usage from the same county, dated 8 days earlier. Each document contributes to the validity of the other.

 

Scott # RB28p

RB28p

Not only a first day of tax usage, which are highly sought after, but also an illegal/improper usage, with RB28 2-cent proprietary battleship used instead of a documentary. A double whammy!

 

Scott # RB45

RB45

Vertical strip of 4 of RB45 (or RB33, no way to be certain), used improperly as documentaries, on a bill of lading.

 

Scott # RF1

RF1

Not a postage stamp used illegally as a documentary, but rather a playing card stamp used as a documentary. All examples on record are from this printing company.

 

Scott # RO157a

RO157a

Scott # RO157a, proprietary match stamp from D. M. Richardson, used illegally/improperly as a documentary on an 1867 handwritten receipt. Very scarce. Ex-Morrissey.

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